Psychology (PSY)

PSY-1000  Foundation in Information Literacy & Research  (3 Credits)  

An introductory course to familiarize students with the necessary skills required to successfully engage in independent research. Specifically, students will develop a knowledge base of how to search for information, how to select appropriate sources of information, and to organize information for scientific research purposes. In addition, students will learn the fundamentals of APA style and basic statistics to enhance their empirically-based research presentations and papers.

Fulfills General Education Requirement: ITML1  
Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-1100  General Psychology  (3 Credits)  

General introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and find- ings of contemporary psychology. This course is part of the General Education program as well as a required course for Psychology majors.

Fulfills General Education Requirement: SEH  
Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-1101  Intro: Psychological Research  (4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100,PSY-1101R  

Designed for Psychology majors, minors, and undeclared stu- dents with a strong interest in psychology. This course is part of the General Education Program and is required as a prerequisite for most psychology courses in the major. An introduction to basic principles of research in psychology, students learn about the scientific method, how to search for and evaluate psychological research, and conduct simple psychological studies to illustrate what has been learned in PSY 1100. Students also learn APA style and basic methods of analyzing data using computer software. A grade of C or better in this course is required to continue in the psychology major/minor program.

Fulfills General Education Requirement: NPW  
Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-1103  Developmental Psych I: Child/Adolescent  (3 Credits)  

An examination of biological, cognitive, psychosocial, and socio-cultural aspects of human development from conception through adolescence. A specific focus will be centered on understanding how the dynamic process and interaction of genetic (nature) and environmental (nurture) factors influence and shape individuals' identities and personhood in infancy, childhood and adolescence. This course is part of the General Education program as well as a required course for Psychology majors.

Fulfills General Education Requirement: SEH  
Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-1104  Developmental Psychology Ii: Adulthood And Aging  (3 Credits)  

A study of the adult life cycle covering early, middle, and late adulthood.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-1108  Life-Span Development  (3 Credits)  

Designed for students in the College nursing program and covers significant stages of physical, cognitive and psychosocial development from infancy through adulthood. Major theories of human development across the life span are discussed. Related research findings that support our understanding of the human life cycle include topics such as developmental milestones, human interactions/communication, and the biopsychosocial changes that are expected as we age. Each of these will be considered in from a cross-cultural perspective.

Fulfills General Education Requirement: SEH  
Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-1114  Human Sexuality  (3 Credits)  

A social-psychological approach to the study of human sexual behavior. Students will be introduced to research design and major findings in the field of human sexuality. Topics discussed include the physiology and the expression of sexual behaviors, communication, pregnancy and birth, sexuality throughout the lifespan, challenges/difficulties in sexual functioning. Topics are explored in the context of today's American society and from a cross-cultural perspective.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-2130  Addictions I  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100 or SOC-1000  

Review of research, theories, and interventions used in the assessment and treatment of different types of addictions including, but not limited to, substance-abuse and gambling.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-2131  Addictions II  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): CJ-3070 or PSY-2130  

Review of therapeutic techniques for all forms of addictive behavior.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-2203  Developmental Psych I: Child/Adolescent  (3 Credits)  

Human development from conception through adolescence; examination of physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-2204  Developmental Psychology Ii: Adulthood And Aging  (3 Credits)  

A study of the adult life cycle covering early, middle, and late adulthood.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-2205  Psychology of Learning  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101  

An introduction to the principals of learning theory as well as discussion of significant research findings in the areas of learning, memory, motivation, and behavior modification. Students are required to conduct a research study and present their findings at the SFC Psychology Science Fair as part of the course requirements

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-2207  Tests and Measurements  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101  

The theoretical framework, underlying principles, and techniques of psychological tests; emphasis is placed upon applied techniques of intelligence testing, interviewing, career assessment, and personality testing.

Typically offered: Fall Only  
PSY-2209  Introduction to Positive Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100  

An investigation into the paradigm shift from mental illness to mental health and the psychology of the whole person. One of the field's central missions is the development of a classification of human strengths and virtues that constitute character. Concepts such as resiliency, human strengths, virtues, as well as empirical research supporting various techniques to enhance optimism, decrease stressors, and significantly increase well-being are explored.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-2213  Group Dynamics  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100 or SOC-1000  

An introduction to group processes. Emphasis is placed upon individual members' psychological functioning. Students engage in classroom activities which demonstrate styles and methods of group interaction.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-2217  Industrialand Organizational Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100, SOC-1000 or BUS-1001  

Psychological theories, methods, research, and specific applications concerning work behavior are discussed. Topics will include selection and evaluation of personnel, training and development, leadership, work motivation, psychological conditions of work, consumer psychology, and the role of psychologists in business environments.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-2229  Psychology of Women  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100 or SOC-1000  

An overview of understanding women from a psychological perspective. Course topics such as gender, relationships, communication, sexuality and work will form the core of issues through which we will explore women, their contributions and their struggles. By reviewing the latest research findings and theoretical underpinnings of women's issues, you will gain an appreciation for women's studies and women in their own right.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-2230  Educational Psychology  (3 Credits)  

A study of the application of psychological theory and research to educational practice from a developmental perspective. Topics include: human growth and development, learning theory, teaching effectiveness, and differentiating instruction and classroom management. Technology-assisted education. A grade of B or higher in this course is required for admission into the teacher education program.

Typically offered: Fall Only  
PSY-2231  Assessment and Evaluation  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): ED-201 and ED-202 with a B or better  

An Introduction to Statistical Methodology, Reliability, and Validity applied to formal and informal assessment techniques in the classroom. Development and use of rubics across the curriculum. Evaluation of high stakes testing programs related to local, state, and national curriculum and learning standards.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-2233  The Psychology of the Exceptional Child  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Minimum GPA 2.75  

Considers the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social characteristics of the atypical child. It explores discrepancies in growth and development, learning disabilities, behavioral and societal problems of the gifted and handicapped, and the implications for curriculum and instruction to meet and exceed state and local learning standards. This course fulfills part of the Special Education requirement for NY State Certification and New York City teaching licenses.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-3300  Statistical Methods in Psychology  (4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): MAT-1104 or higher, ,PSY-1101  

Intended for sophomores. The use of statistics in psychology;descriptive and inferential techniques, prediction, and tests of significance. Use of computers in statistical analysis is emphasized.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-3301  Qualitative Research in Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY 1101,PSY-3300  

An overview of the theoretical and philosophical background of qualitative research methods in psychology is provided in comparison to those of quantitative research methods. Fundamental skills to conduct a qualitative study are taught using various hands-on activities such focus group discussions and interviews. Students participate collaboratively with their classmate and their instructor to analyze/interpret provided data sets. Students will design a qualitative study and collect and report the findings in an APA Style paper. This course is especially helpful for those wishing to pursue a graduate degree.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-3307  Theories of Personality  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101,Two 2000-level PSY courses  

A comparison of principal personality theories with special focus on the development of personality as well as its structure and behavioral implications.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-3312  Social Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101,Two 2000-level PSY courses  

Selected topics in areas such as conformity, obedience, sexual attitudes and behavior, aggression, prejudice, and the distinction between the view of human nature as stemming from biological versus social influences (i.e., nature vs. nurture debates).

Typically offered: Fall Only  
PSY-3320  Cognitive Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101,Two 2000-leve PSY courses  

An introduction to the science of cognitive psychology covering topics such as perception, concept formation, attention, language, decision making, memory and persuasion. Emphasis is placed on the distinction between conscious and non-conscious processing - in particular how mental processes outside of our awareness influence our behavior.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-3360  Psychobiology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100, PSY-1101, and one of the following: PSY-1103,,PSY-2205, or PSY-2207  

Study of the brain and the nervous system in relation to behavior. Basic neuroanatomy as well as the organizational structure of the nervous system as a whole is discussed. Biological influences are explored in relation to areas of interest such as memory, motivation, emotion, sleep, addiction, and causes/treatments of mental illness.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-3370  Gender Roles in Cross Cultural Perspectives  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101, SOC-1000 and one higher PSY elective  

This course reviews changing gender roles, gender differences, sexuality, kinship systems, gender-typed status hierarchies, cultural perceptions of the nature of men and women, biological differences, and socialization and parenting practices across cultures. Special emphasis will be placed on multidisciplinary approaches, in-depth investigations of gender roles in specific societies, and the value of a global perspective on gender roles.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-3380  Cross-Cultural Psychology/Communication  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): ICS-1241 OR PSY-1103 or higher  

Cross-listed with: ICS-3380. Focuses on both the universal and the culture-specific aspects of human behavior, as well as theories, and research methods in the field of cross- cultural and multicultural psychology. Topics including concepts of self, stereotyping, , prejudice, gender roles, belief systems, cross-cultural contact, culture change, views of morality, and multiple identities (in and across societies) are examined.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-3381  Children and Adolescents in a Cross-Cultural Perspective  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100 or PSY-1103,PSY-3380  

A broad review of primary sources examining how children and adolescents around the world develop and are socialized. Emphasis is placed on cross-cultural findings on topics such as attachment, parenting, schooling, peer relations, socialization, and immigration. Issues relating to children and adolescents growing up in American immigrant families are also explored.

PSY-4000  Seminar in Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This course covers one particular topic for each section offered. Topics include but are not limited to the psychology of multiculturalism, cross-cultural and international psychology, school psychology, clinical and counseling psychology, health psychology, and forensic psychology. Topics are chosen to reflect both the interests of the students and current areas of concern in psychology. Students are allowed to take two seminar courses.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4001  Seminar: Intro to School Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This course covers one particular topic for each section offered. Topics include but are not limited to the psychology of multiculturalism, cross-cultural and international psychology, school psychology, clinical and counseling psychology, health psychology, and forensic psychology. Topics are chosen to reflect both the interests of the students and current areas of concern in psychology. Students are allowed to take two seminar courses.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4002  Seminar: Clinical Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This course covers one particular topic for each section offered. Topics include but are not limited to the psychology of multiculturalism, cross-cultural and international psychology, school psychology, clinical and counseling psychology, health psychology, and forensic psychology. Topics are chosen to reflect both the interests of the students and current areas of concern in psychology. Students are allowed to take two seminar courses.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4003  Seminar: International Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This course covers one particular topic for each section offered. Topics include but are not limited to the psychology of multiculturalism, cross-cultural and international psychology, school psychology, clinical and counseling psychology, health psychology, and forensic psychology. Topics are chosen to reflect both the interests of the students and current areas of concern in psychology. Students are allowed to take two seminar courses.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4004  Seminar: Multiculturalism  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This course covers one particular topic for each section offered. Topics include but are not limited to the psychology of multiculturalism, cross-cultural and international psychology, school psychology, clinical and counseling psychology, health psychology, and forensic psychology. Topics are chosen to reflect both the interests of the students and current areas of concern in psychology. Students are allowed to take two seminar courses.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4005  Seminar: Human Resources  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

In this course, students will examine the various functions within the discipline of Human Resource Management. Students will explore the responsibilities within the four major areas of the discourse including Training and Development, Recruitment and Selection, Compensation and Benefits, and Employee Relations. Students will engage the material through methodologies such as mock interviews, class discussions, and analytical review of case studies, reading, reflection writing, and presentations.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4006  Seminar: Multicultural Counseling and Healing  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This seminar focuses on multicultural counseling, psychotherapy, and healing as seen from a global perspective. Topics of the seminar include the role of culture in the treatment of culturally diverse population in the United States; shamanism; healing and therapeutic traditions in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Arab world; the role of women as healers; psychological principles common to therapy and healing across cultures; counseling refugees; and others. The seminar also includes discussions of the role of religion in traditional healing rituals. The readings include a handbook on culture and healing as well as preprints of a forthcoming book on multicultural counseling, both edited by the instructor. The seminar is especially appropriate for juniors and seniors with a background in psychology in other social sciences. Participants in the seminar will be asked to give a class presentation on a topic of their choice. The course can be used to fulfill the seminar requirement for psychology majors or may be used as a psychology elective.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4007  Seminar: Sports Psychology Healing  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This course is designed to help students both learn and then apply practical as well as theoretical information as it relates to the psychology of sport. Various mental training skills that can enhance one's athletic performance will also be covered. Some of the areas related to this class that will be explored this semester include stress, motivation, goal-setting, leadership, and imagery. Our personality, as it relates to athletic competition, as well as competition in the real world,"" will also be investigated.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4008  Seminar: Mental Health and Technology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses,  

This course will discuss the use of technology in the delivery of mental health care (MHC). This new and growing modality has important potential for improving the data collection for research designed to develop and measure evidence-based MHC. Technology, such as new powerful computers and servers, including cloud services, are used to develop and deliver health care to nearly every location in the United States and globally to millions of people in other countries. Students will learn about the technology-based modalities used for the delivery of MHC and will review the future challenges for mental health technologies.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4009  Seminar: Positive Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses,  

Compelling evidence that individuals can increase their happiness by identifying and utilizing their signature strengths has been found in the research on positive psychology. This course will focus on the paradigm shift from pathology to strengths-based psychology in the rapidly growing field of positive psychology. Designed to explore the contemporary research on the science of happiness and meaning as the central theme of positive psychology, we will explore the variables critical to maximizing human potential and fulfillment. Course topics will include: optimism, life satisfaction, emotional intelligence, nature of meaning and purpose, humor, signature strengths, self-esteem and sense of self. Additionally, the course will examine how concepts in positive psychology can inform interventions in areas such as personal relationships, family, parenting, school, work and leisure.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4010  Seminar: Clinical and Counseling Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This seminar is designed to introduce you to the principle concepts involved in the fields of clinical and counseling psychology. The course will require integration of knowledge from other psychology courses (e.g., general, abnormal) as well as the ability to apply new material. The purpose of this seminar is to familiarize you with the disciplines of clinical and counseling psychology and to teach basic therapeutic techniques.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4011  Seminar: Intro to Comparative Cognition  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Four PSY courses  

This course is an introduction to the field of comparative cognitive - a growing field in psychology. We will discuss the pros and cons of cross species comparisons as well as delving into the various research methods employed when working with nonhuman subjects. Topics covered will include basic experimental design, intelligence and consciousness, logic, concept formation, language"" studies with apes and marine mammal species, self-awareness, culture, and ethics.

Typically offered: On Demand  
PSY-4012  Seminar: Behavior Modification  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level,  

This course is based upon the Psychology of learning and reviews some basic concepts in the study of learning. Lectures then move on to focus on the various forms of behavioral treatments for psychological disorders. It includes a 15-hour field placement in a behavioral treatment setting which can include schools and mental health treatment programs. Open to Psychology Majors and other majors with permission.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4013  Sem: Human Life Cycle in Cross Cultural Perspective  (3 Credits)  

Cross-cultural psychologists, anthropologists and historians have studied the human life cycle in a considerable variety of Western and non-Western cultures. In this context, infancy, childhood, and adolescence have received special attention. This course includes a broad selection of primary sources that portray how humans all around the world have conducted and reflected upon their lives. Students will be exposed to cutting-edge research in international psychology and anthropology.

PSY-4014  Seminar: Marine Animal Behavior  (3 Credits)  

Cross-listed with: BIO-1102, BIO-4000 and BIO-5401. Discussion and analysis of problems in psychology that are not covered in regular course work. The general content of the course consists of biological and ecological effects on animal behavior in a marine environment. The specific content of the course will remain flexible in response to student and departmental interest. Course requires travel. Contact Dr. Biolsi in the Psychology Department at kbiolsi@stfranciscollege.edu

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4015  Seminar on the Human-Animal Interaction: Animal Assisted Therapy and Activities  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): 3 PSY courses from 3000/4000 levels  

This course will broadly focus on the relationships and interactions between humans and nonhuman animals. Theoretical and practical aspects will be discussed in regards to Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) and Animal Assisted Activities (AAA). Specifically, we will discuss interactions with animals as therapeutic treatments in a hospital or home environment, as well as animals that assist individuals such as in the case of search and rescue as well as those who assist with various handicaps (e.g., seeing-eye dogs).

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4016  Seminar: Cognitive Neuroscience  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course is an extension of psychobiology. We will review and discuss the anatomy of the nervous system and there will be a demonstration of a brain dissection for those who are interested. The focus of the course will be the physiological underpinnings of various psychological phenomena such as phantom limbs, aphasia, perception, concept formation, language, decision making, and memory. We will also study and discuss current techniques used to investigate the biological aspects of our mind, such as MRI, PET scan and TMS.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4017  Seminar:Attachment and Attraction The Science of Human Relationships  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

Relationship science is a multidisciplinary field which draws from subject areas such as psychology, biology, sociology, anthropology, etc. A variety of perspectives all converge to help determine what leads some relationships to flourish, while others are doomed to fail. This course will examine the neuropsychological, biological, evolutionary, and sociological perspectives of human bonding. As a class we will look at attachment from birth until death to determine what leads to a lasting relationship. Attraction, mating, love, commitment, and divorce will all be discussed, as well as implications for this science in our everyday lives and its impact on life satisfaction and well-being. Briefly stated, the objectives include (though are not limited to): Improve your understanding of relationship science and the various disciplines which comprise it; ""Critically examine pair bonding from a variety of different psychological perspectives; ""Examine attachment theories and their implications for development; ""Understand the components of attraction and how this leads to bonding; ""Assess the studies that have been done and determine what we still need to research; and ""Discuss the real world implications for this science.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4018  Seminar:decision Making& Problem Solving The Science of Human Relationships  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

The goal of this course is to support the development of critical thinking skills and to provide students with a more complete foundation for decision making. Various problem solving strategies will be discussed such as persuasion, probability, logic, and framing. We will discuss real world scenarios, such as advertising, and how our decision making process is effected by both conscious and non-conscious psychological processes.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4019  Seminar: Marine Mammal Cognition  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course is designed with two main components: A lecture component on campus at SFC and an experiential learning component that includes travel to Santa Cruz California. The course revolves around marine mammal cognition but general aspects of cognitive psychology. Topics covered will include basic experimental design, sensation/perception, intelligence and consciousness, logic, concept formation, language"" studies with marine mammal species, and ethics. Students will learn about and observe data collection sessions with captive, trained seals, sea lions, sea otters and dolphins. The eccology of sea lion habitat as well as marine mammal physiology will also be explored.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4020  Seminar: Forensic Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 ,Two PSY courses at 3000/4000 Level  

This course is an introduction to the science of forensic psychology. Students will be exposed to the psychological and legal issues relevant to various specialties within the field including adjudicative competence, security clearances and parental fitness. Other areas covered include overview of the American legal system; an overview of the American mental health system; legal research and writing; psychological research and writing; ethical issues in forensic psychology; legal ethics; and career choices.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4021  Seminar: Introduction to Animal Assisted Therapy  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course introduces a rationale and theoretical framework for students interested in animal-human bonds and how these can produce psychological and physical health benefits. Special populations for which AAT will be considered include geriatric and Alzheimer's patients in long-term health care facilities, children with psychological disturbance, veterans and domestic violence survivors diagnosed with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). This course will aid students in introducing AAT as an adjunct to the existing practice of an agency or provider.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4022  Seminar: Health Psychology Therapy  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course will examine how psychological, biological, and social factors affect physical and mental health. The course will examine theoretical and empirical research in psychology and related fields and cover a number of topics such as theories of health promotion and prevention, personality and health, the psychology of risky health behaviors, stress, coping with chronic illness, psychoneuroimmunology, social relationships and health, and psychological barriers to health behavior change. The course will be taught primarily from a social-psychological perspective but will also draw from other perspectives such as clinical psychology.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4023  Seminar: Persuasion & Propaganda Therapy  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course will examine the use of persuasion and propaganda from psycho-socio-political viewpoints. Persuasion permeates our lives. Everyday we are inundated with persuasive messages, whether it is from the media, our politicians, the food labels we see in our grocery stores, or individuals selling a product. Research has shown that individuals are susceptible to persuasion, so much so that many of our choices and life decisions are swayed without our knowledge or understanding of how or why we make the choices that we do. Being informed and prepared are some of basic tools needed to overcome the traps"" of persuasion. Students will benefit from this seminar in that critical thinking and perspective taking are part and parcel to ""seeing through"" or even developing persuasive techniques. An interdisciplinary focus will enhance an appreciation of how politics, the media and societal trends are undoubtedly interrelated.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4024  Human Morality in Cultural Perspective  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

Many scholars and researchers in various disciplines such as philosophy, psychology, education, business, medical fields, and so on have studied human moral behaviors, broadly defined, because understanding human morality helps us widen our world view, establish ways of life desirable and contributing, develop safe and fair societies as well as sharpen our critical thinking skills and grow as matured citizens. Particularly if we approach human morality from cultural perspective, it can lead us to appreciate the importance of diversity in societies and equip oneself with openness, generosity, and harmonious life styles. This course provides an overview of the philosophical underpinnings and the empirical (psychological) research findings on human morality in cultural (as well as universal) perspective. The first phase of the course presents the philosophical foundations of the current understanding of morality. And then, it introduces various empirical approaches to human morality in, for example, evolutionary, neuroscientific, psychological, and educational fields. Finally, the course unfolds cultural aspects of morality to help students construct more comparable and realistic views and understanding of human. Students will read, understand, and discuss topics in book chapters as well as published studies in academic journals. Students' achievements will be assessed by their participation to class discussions, responses to reading questions, three commentary essays on readings/discussions, and a final paper.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4025  Seminar: Humanistic Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course is designed to assist you in understanding the origins and development of humanistic psychology. Humanistic Psychology serves as an orientation to experience psychology from a holistic standpoint. In other words, 'the psychology of being human' demonstrates respect for the dignity of human worth, open-mindedness towards differential approaches to the human experience, and interest in the exploration of novel ways of human thought and behavior. We will examine the theories of humanistic psychology and implore a strong 'theory of mind' to understand humanistic psychological practices.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4026  Seminar: Psychology of Emotions  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course will provide an examination of theoretical perspectives and research on human emotions. Course topics will include: basic emotional processes, emotion regulation, emotional awareness, as well as the role of emotions in psychiatric disorders.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4027  Psychotherapy Across Rel Communities  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course surveys central issues in the psychology of religion and spirituality, with an emphasis on psychotherapy, measurement, and research methods. It covers the foundations and history of the psychology of religion, religion through the developmental lens, the construction, definition, and expression of religion and spirituality, multicultural issues, clinical competency, and applied areas.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4028  Seminar: Psychology of Prejudice & Discrimination  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101 and 2 PSY courses at 300/400 level  

This course will provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice and discrimination. We will examine in depth, several issues that are central to research in this area. The topics include, but are not limited to: the development of prejudice among children, the role of cognitive, social, personality, and motivational factors in maintaining prejudice, the psychological consequences of prejudice and discrimination, research on specific types of prejudice such as racism, sexism, and ageism, and strategies for reducing prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup conflict.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4409  Abnormal Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101,PSY-1103,One 3000-level PSY course  

An examination of abnormal behavior focusing on DSM-5 diagnoses. Discussion will incorporate differing views of the etiology and treatment of abnormal behavior such as schizophrenia and depression from different theoretical and historical perspectives. Classification of abnormal behavior in consideration of biological, psychosocial, and socio-cultural viewpoints are discussed.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-4411  History and Systems of Psychology  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101,Two PSY courses level 2000 or higher  

The history of modern psychology since the 17th century. Emphasis is placed upon the major schools of thought including structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, and humanistic psychology.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-4420  Applied Psychology  (4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101,Two 3000-level PSY courses,Junior or Senior standing required  

Supervised fieldwork in selected settings including (but not limited to) schools, hospitals, social service agencies, city and federal agencies, and businesses. Students participate in two class meetings per week on campus where they focus on how previous coursework might be applied in various career paths. Foci are also on professional ethics and assistance in the clarification of student Students are assisted in clarifying their career-related goals. Requires 100-hours of supervised field experience that is pre-approved by the professor.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-4460  Brain and Behavior  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): 4 PSY courses  

Study of the brain and other parts of the nervous system. Topics covered include the organizational structure of the nervous system, and neurological influences upon learning, memory, motivation, emotion, sleep and arousal, and mental illness.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4461  Sensation and Perception  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1101,PSY-3360  

Overview of the sensory systems, topics include the traditional five human senses (vision, hearing, taste, smell and touch) but more unique topics such as pain perception, phantom limbs, visual and auditory illusions, and sensory mapping are explored.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4990  Field Experience in Psychology I  (1-4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-4420,Instructor approval required  

Observation and supervised experience within selected applied settings. This course does not satisfy the requirement for supervised student teaching and cannot be substituted for ED 404.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-4991  Field Experience in Psychology II  (1-4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-4420,Instructor approval required  

Observation and supervised experience within selected applied settings. This course does not satisfy the requirement for supervised student teaching and cannot be substituted for ED 404.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-4995  Independent Research in Psychology I  (1-4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-4998,Department Chairman approval required  

Individual investigation into a topic of research in psychology under the direction of a faculty member of the department. Approval of the department Chairperson is required.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-4996  Independent Research in Psychology II  (1-4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-4998,Department Chairman approval is required  

Individual investigation into a topic of research in psychology under the direction of a faculty member of the department. Approval of the department Chairperson is required.

Typically offered: All Sessions  
PSY-4998  Experimental Psychology 1  (4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-3300 ,PSY-4998R  

The first course in a two-semester senior thesis requirement for all psychology majors (see PSY4999). Research methodology emphasizing experimental design is covered. Students conduct a comprehensive review of research literature on a chosen topic, write a detailed review paper of their research, and develop a research question and hypothesis for implementation in PSY 4499 (Experimental Psychology II). This course partially satisfies the requirement for the senior thesis in psychology. A grade of C or better in this course is required to continue in the psychology major program.

Typically offered: Spring Only  
PSY-4999  Experimental Psychology II  (4 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-1100 ,PSY-1101,PSY-3300,PSY-4998  

A continuation of Experimental Psychology I (PSY4998). Students develop research procedures for their proposed experiment from PSY 4998, gather appropriate participants, collect data, conduct statistical analysis, and write a research paper in APA Style. Students also present their projects at the Psychology Science Fair held at SFC. Along with successful completion of PSY4498, this course satisfies the requirement for the senior thesis in psychology. A grade of C or better in this course is required to continue in the psychology major program.

Typically offered: Fall Only  
PSY-5010  Contemporary Migration  (3 Credits)  

Cross-listed with: SOC-5010. This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of contemporary migration. The major focus is on the United States, with an international context. Migration is related to many central issues for contemporary society, such as international relations, the development of cities, urban politics, social policy, citizenship, and racial and ethnic identity.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-5011  Attachment and Attraction  (3 Credits)  

Relationship science is a multidisciplinary field which draws from subject areas such as psychology, biology, sociology, anthropology, etc. A variety of perspectives all converge to help determine what leads some relationships to flourish, while others are doomed to fail. This course will examine the neuropsychological, biological, evolutionary, and sociological perspectives of human bonding. As a class we will look at attachment from birth until death to determine what leads to a lasting relationship. Attraction, mating, love, commitment, and divorce will all be discussed, as well as implications for this science in our everyday lives and its impact on life satisfaction and well-being. Briefly stated, the goals of this course are (though are not limited to): .Improve your understanding of relationship science and the various disciplines which comprise it; .Critically examine pair bonding from a variety of different psychological perspectives; .Examine attachment theories and their implications for development; .Understand the components of attraction and how this leads to bonding; .Assess the studies that have been done and determine what we still need to research; and .Discuss the real world implications for this science.

Fulfills General Education Requirement: NPW, SEH  
Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-5012  Research Controversies  (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enhance students' abilities to critically examine scientific information and scientific controversies from a variety of fields. Student will learn how to find reliable/valid information and evaluate research claims. Much of the course will involve evaluating various controversies in science, particularly ones that have been covered in the popular press (e.g., vaccine-autism debate). Students will critically evaluate both sides of the controversies. Examples from multiple disciplines will be discussed (e.g., social, medical research). The ethical obligations of researchers in terms of conducting research and disseminating research will also be discussed. The course will be reading and writing intensive.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-5352  "Images of Human Nature in Western, Non-Literate, and Eastern Cultures: An Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar I"  (3 Credits)  

Cross-listed with: REL-5352. Students in this seminar are exposed to conceptions of human nature as they have existed in non-literate, Eastern, and Western cultures. The seminar focuses upon both the universal aspects of human experience and on unique historical and cultural conceptions of human identity. These conceptions may be expressed in art, myths, literature, sacred books, philopophical treatises, etc., and are in various ways reflected in day-to-day living. The seminar is team-taught, stresses broad interdisciplinary perspectives, and emphasizes original readings. Visits to plays, operas, movies, and museums form an integral part of the seminar. For students in Honors Program only.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-5353  "Images of Human Nature in Western, Non-Literate, and Eastern Cultures: An Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar II"  (3 Credits)  

Cross-listed with: REL-5353. Students in this seminar are exposed to conceptions of human nature as they have existed in non-literate, Eastern, and Western cultures. The seminar focuses upon both the universal aspects of human experience and on unique historical and cultural conceptions of human identity. These conceptions may be expressed in art, myths, literature, sacred books, philopophical treatises, etc., and are in various ways reflected in day-to-day living. The seminar is team-taught, stresses broad interdisciplinary perspectives, and emphasizes original readings. Visits to plays, operas, movies, and museums form an integral part of the seminar. For students in Honors Program only.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-5419  Seminar: Marine Mammal Cognition  (3 Credits)  

This course is designed with two main components: A lecture component on campus at SFC and an experiential learning component that includes travel to Santa Cruz California. The course revolves around marine mammal cognition but general aspects of cognitive psychology. Topics covered will include basic experimental design, sensation/perception, intelligence and consciousness, logic, concept formation, language"" studies with marine mammal species, and ethics. Students will learn about and observe data collection sessions with captive, trained seals, sea lions, sea otters and dolphins. The eccology of sea lion habitat as well as marine mammal physiology will also be explored.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-5420  Human Morality in Cultural Perspective  (3 Credits)  

Many scholars and researchers in various disciplines such as philosophy, psychology, education, business, medical fields, and so on have studied human moral behaviors, broadly defined, because understanding human morality helps us widen our world view, establish ways of life desirable and contributing, develop safe and fair societies as well as sharpen our critical thinking skills and grow as matured citizens. Particularly if we approach human morality from cultural perspective, it can lead us to appreciate the importance of diversity in societies and equip oneself with openness, generosity, and harmonious life styles. This course provides an overview of the philosophical underpinnings and the empirical (psychological) research findings on human morality in cultural (as well as universal) perspective. The first phase of the course presents the philosophical foundations of the current understanding of morality. And then, it introduces various empirical approaches to human morality in, for example, evolutionary, neuroscientific, psychological, and educational fields. Finally, the course unfolds cultural aspects of morality to help students construct more comparable and realistic views and understanding of human. Students will read, understand, and discuss topics in book chapters as well as published studies in academic journals. Students' achievements will be assessed by their participation to class discussions, responses to reading questions, three commentary essays on readings/discussions, and a final paper.

Fulfills General Education Requirement: PEM, WHG  
Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-5470  Seminar: Children and Adolescents In a Cross-Cultural Perspective  (3 Credits)  

This seminar focuses on psychosocially and culturally oriented studies of children and adolescents conducted by social scientists in western and nonwestern countries. The goal of the seminar is to arrive at a global understanding of childhood including the cultural, economic, ecological, and political conditions determining developmental trajectories in a wide variety of cultural groups. Open to Honors Students

Fulfills General Education Requirement: SEH, WHG  
PSY-6205  Behavioral Perspectives in Learning and Motivation  (3 Credits)  

Graduate students only. Examines theories and research in the field of learning and motivation and their implications for practice. Biological, cultural and environmental/contextual influences upon motivation are discussed. Focus is on how psychologists can use current knowledge in learning theory, along with motivational factors, in the applied areas of the discipline. These include areas such as education, mental health, and forensics.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-6207  Psychological Assessment and Diagnosis  (3 Credits)  

Graduate students only. This course aims at familiarizing students with the field of psychological assessment. The course is designed to develop in students a high level of competence in this discipline by providing up-to-date practical, research, and theoretical information. The emphasis of the course is on measuring behaviors in applied settings and in discussing the practical benefits and the important limitations of psychological assessment.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-6213  Group Theory and Counseling  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-6205  

Graduate students only. Provides a conceptual and experiential introduction to group dynamics. Foci include approaches to group counseling, techniques and styles of group leadership, and the facilitation of group processes in counseling and other situations. It is designed to introduce students to group work with adults, youths, and children in various settings by conducting counseling groups within the classroom and with the instructor.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-6233  Psychological Aspects of Disabilities  (3 Credits)  

Graduate students only. An integration of information about the medical and social aspects of disability along with the potential psychological problems that may ensue. Functional abilities and limitations will be considered along with the medical and psychological terminology needed to understand physicians' and psychologists' reports. Topics include how societal factors such as stigma and lack of resources may affect those with disabilities as well as the dynamics of adjustment, conflicts that may arise from disabilities, coping mechanisms, and the impact on the individual and their families.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-6360  Cognitive Neuroscience  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-6205  

Graduate students only. Focuses on the neural basis of cognition and the exciting area of neuroplasticity. Readings and discussions center on research in the field pertaining to individuals with and without brain damage using both behavioral and physiological methods. Specific topics of cognition include neural development, memory, language, pain, aphasia, synesthesia, and the biological basis for disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, and autism. Brain damage and related rehabilitation is also discussed in relation to neuroplasticity

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-6380  Psychology of Diversity Motivation  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): Complete PSY-6205.  

Graduate students only. An advanced course examining theories, methods and findings in multicultural psychology, with emphasis given to the impact culture has on human perception and experience. Issues such as the complexity of identity, privilege and oppression, and the importance of cultural contexts in counseling and other settings are explored.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-6401  Foundations of Counseling Theory and Clinical Assesment  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-6205  

Graduate students only. This course explores different theoretical foundations and their practical implications in psychological counseling. Focus is on various orientations such as psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and humanistic-existential. Students will learn the effectiveness of using different perspectives in treatment.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-6995  Independent Study in Psychology  (1-4 Credits)  

Graduate students only. Independent research and study in a topic in Psychology including submission of a written report. Prerequisites: graduate standing and approval of the department chairperson.

Typically offered: On Demand  
PSY-7012  Behavioral Assessment and Intervention  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-6205  

Graduate students only. Expands upon the general principles of assessment introduced in PSY6207 (Behavioral Assessment and Diagnosis) to illustrate applications of assessment to planning and evaluating clinical interventions. Students will gain an understanding of how operant conditioning triggers and maintains behaviors and cognitions. Behavioral assessment recording and monitoring techniques, including ABA designs, and instruments used in diagnosis will be discussed. A review of how to implement behavior change including the use of shaping, successive approximation, in vitro/in vivo techniques using relaxation and imagery will be reviewed.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-7101  Professional Issues and Ethics  (1 Credit)  
Requisite(s): PSY-6205  

Graduate students only. Focuses on standards of professional conduct and ethical issues within the field of psychology. Students will be familiarized with ethics codes and develop an ability to apply these codes to a variety of situations including privacy, treatment of clinical clients, research design, treatment of research participants, and standards of professional conduct within the field. Emphasis is on the development of students' ability to apply ethical standards in a variety of situations. with Includes discussions of ethical dilemmas that may arise when working in a variety of settings with clients, research participants, and non-human animals

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-7330  Adv. Experimental Methods & Statistics  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-6205  

Graduate students only. Centers on advanced design and statistical analyses in research. Course content includes various methodologies beyond those learned at the undergraduate level. Methodologies focus on core principles of quality research and the importance of understanding the context in which science occurs. A higher order, more complex understanding of data analysis will compliment research design discussions and exercises.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-7400  Graduate Seminar  (2 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-6205  

Graduate students only. Discusses current research and theories for an in-depth examination of one topic chosen to reflect an intersection between the interests of our students, specialties of the instructors, and current trends in the field of psychology. Topics include, but are not limited to cross-cultural child development, relationships and attachment, and the nature of consciousness.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-7990  Supervised Practicum I  (3 Credits)  

Graduate students only. First part of a two-semester course (see PSY7991). Students apply their coursework and foundational knowledge of psychology in a chosen area of interest by engaging in 300 hours of supervised fieldwork over the two-semesters. Approximately one-half (150 hours) of fieldwork should be completed by the end of this course. Students also participate in meetings with their practicum instructor on campus. Placements have included (but are not limited to) schools, hospitals, social service agencies, human resources, city and federal agencies, and businesses. The placement should reflect student career interests and students are responsible for finding their own placements with help from faculty as needed

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-7991  Supervised Practicum II  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-7990  

Graduate students only. A continuation of PSY 7990. Students continue their onsite work and complete their 300 hours in their practicum field placement. An APA Style paper integrating a research literature review with their practical experiences in the field is required, as well as a presentation to the Department of the culmination of their work for PSY 7990 and 7991

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-7998  Supervised Thesis I  (3 Credits)  

Graduate students only. First part of a two-semester course (see PSY7999). Designed for students interested in further pursuing their graduate career, especially at the doctoral level. With supervision from a research mentor, students develop a research rationale/hypothesis and successfully create a research proposal. After the proposal is approved by a thesis committee, students complete a written literature review on their topic that will serve as the Introduction section to their final thesis paper. An application for IRB approval will be completed and submitted to their academic committee for review.

Typically offered: As Needed  
PSY-7999  Supervised Thesis II  (3 Credits)  
Requisite(s): PSY-7998  

Graduate students only. A continuation of research from Supervised Thesis I (PSY7998). This course will culminate in an APA Style paper that is of publication quality in a peer-reviewed journal. Students orally defend their thesis to the academic committee assembled during Supervised Thesis I (PSY 7998).

Typically offered: As Needed